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May 20, 2009

Comments

David

Owch!

Random thoughts:

1 gaming industry benefit in long termfrom a culture of creation rather than just consumption.

2 the amazing engagement (especially in boys) with subjects they traditionally hate due to game centric teaching (I'm thinking of the Adventure Author p7 results presented at NILE last year)

3 demystiphying of computer science - pointing to the decrease in cs applications in last few years

4 as subset of above, talk about benefit / potential of girls in cs

5 modern society needing problem solving skills rather than rote learning. Designing games exposes patterns and logic that isn't otherwise intuitive

Just some random ideas...,

Nicole

That is outrageous! In addition to David's ideas, here's a list of links on my delicious accounts, I just grabbed one tag: http://delicious.com/nkipar/e-learning

HEFCE just brought out another report/strategy JISC has got some: http://delicious.com/nkipar/JISC then don't forget the QAA themes, such as Flexible Delivery

Judy

Useful thoughts - thanks guys!

Keiron Nicholson

I'd echo 3 that David mentions - serious shortage of computing-related skills in the country (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/6155998.stm and http://www.computerweekly.com/Articles/2008/06/06/230971/skills-shortage-looms-as-student-numbers-drop.htm) while demand continues to rise and CS applications (continue to?) drop.

Meanwhile, we're boring kids to death in school with spreadsheets etc., so that they never do anything as cool with a computer in school as they could do by themselves at home. By the time a younger generation of teachers comes through to redress this the problem will be much worse and Britain/Scotland will have lost untold opportunities for economic growth through all of the computing-related work that NOBODY is doing because there's nobody to do it! AA etc. engage children with their work and introduce important programming/design/testing concepts that lay the foundations for engagement with CS in general.

Plus in Scotland specifically, particularly important to provide exciting new activities for the Curriculum for Excellence, otherwise it'll revert back to the Curriculum for Boring by default.

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